Castle Park View

Bristol

Bouygues UK has designing and is building what will be the tallest residential building in the city centre of Bristol. The scheme, which overlooks Castle Park on the site of a former ambulance station and forms part of the city’s major regeneration plans, is being delivered for Linkcity in agreement Homes England, Bristol City Council, M&G Real Estate and Yarlington Housing GroupThe landmark 26-storey residential tower will provide 375 new homes, comprising 300 one and two-bedroom private rented sector homes apartments and 75 affordable homes, spanning a gross internal floor area of 29,373m2.

26-storey tower
Bristol’s highest residential tower
29373m2
375new homes

Castle Park View is located to the south east of Castle Park, which is Bristol’s largest urban green space. Positioned on the site of a medieval castle and the culverted River Frome, with close proximity to the main A4044, Cabot Circus shopping centre and nearby offices, the project presents a complex set of constraints and considerations. In line with Bristol City Council’s usual planning requirements, we have produced a comprehensive Construction Management Plan, which details all aspects of our construction methodology including safety and traffic management.

Set within the environs of Bristol’s old medieval castle, it has been necessary to plan works with sensitivity to the site’s archaeological interest. Prior to commencement of works on site, and in line with planning condition requirements, we commissioned an archaeological dig to locate the existing dry ditch between the castle site and the river. During excavation works, we appointed Bristol and West Archaeology to carry out a watching brief. An Archaeology Officer has been employed for the duration of the excavation works, tasked with identifying any finds of interest to enable discussion with Bristol City Council’s archaeological officer. For example, during groundworks operations our site team discovered a historic wall. We ceased work in the area to allow the appointed Archaeology Officer to assess the wall for historic importance. The archaeologist dated the wall as circa 17th century, deeming it to be of no significant interest, thus allowing works to recommence.

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